Bloomington

Director:

F. Cardosa

Producer:

J. Shumway

Year:

2010

Distributor:

Wolfe Video

Country:

USA

Running time:

83 min

Genre:

Drama

Format:

Colour

Availability:

DVD

Keywords:

Woman professor, psychology, Lesbian, Professor - student sexual relationship, Bildungsroman
Summary:
Jackie (Sarah Stouffer) is a former child star who has taken a break from acting to attend college. Jackie's first few days on campus — like the majority of Hollywood's depictions of university life — are depicted in the same way as any other high school teen pic, or an episode of De Grassi Junior High, i.e., the high school principal becomes a "Dean," and the first couple of Jackie's professors are caricatures of those rumpled, middle-age, covered-with-chalk-dust history teachers who hand out detentions. However, when Professor Catherine Stark (Allison McAtee) strides into the classroom and — like all Hollywood professors must — writes her name in big letters on the blackboard, it becomes clear why a university setting is required. What follows is a typical tale of the dire consequences of a sexual relationship between a professor and student. Although the film was promoted as an erotic lesbian love-affair verging on soft-core pornography — Bloomington was an official selection at the 2010 San Francisco International LGBT Film Festival — the most explicit things get is a brief scene with Jackie taking a bubble bath under her professor's admiring gaze.
Teaching Notes:
Portrayal of professors Despite the film's purported celebration of lesbian love, we get the same old Hollywood stereotype lecherous male professors: Catherine Stark is a combination of Basic Instinct's Catherine (Sharon Stone) and Jean Brodie. Similarly, the plot is identical to numerous Hollywood films depict the downfall of womanizing professors — except that it's a woman doing the womanizing. The results are predictable: news of the affair gets out; Catherine is shamed and humiliated by her students, and summarily fired by the Dean. On the other hand, a wiser and more mature Jackie resumes her acting career; essentially, the film is a clumsy attempt at making a sort of lesbian bildungsroman.